Secrets of Oaklands Wetland revealed

Find out about the animals, birds and plants that are thriving at Oaklands wetland.

 City Limits Magazine Issue 47 December 2014 front coverThis article appears in City Limits magazine - Issue 47 - December 2014.

Download
City Limits here

A recent survey has revealed Oaklands wetland is teeming with more than 130 species of animals, birds and plants just 12 months after it opened to the public.

Animals include the nationally protected Grey-headed Flying-fox, native Southern Goby fish, Spotted Marsh Frog, Marbled Gecko and Lynx Spider while Kangaroo Grass, Yellow Buttons and Native Scurf-Pea are among the plant life.

The dramatic findings were revealed following Marion’s first BioBlitz at the end of August which saw more than 450 scientists and members of the public band together to seek out and record life at the wetland.

BioBlitz organiser Dr Philip Roetman from the University of South Australia said the event helped people have fun while getting close to science and nature.

“People were surprised by the variety of life at the wetland, including four species of seldom-seen micro-bats, and flying foxes that only moved into Adelaide a few years ago,” Dr Roetman said.

“The most popular surveys were night time spotlighting and identifying reptiles, birds, bats, and frogs.” 

The full list of species found at Oaklands wetland has been added to the Atlas of Living Australia - an online database for Australian plants, animals, and fungi.

City Limits Magazine - Dec 14 - Issue 47 - Oaklands Wetland SecretsBioBlitz was organised by the Discovery Circle, a program of the University of South Australia, and run in partnership with the City of Marion and SA Museum as part of the Marion Learning Festival and National Science Week. Information about Discovery Circle is available online at discoverycircle.org.au

Oaklands wetland cost $9 million and has been designed to capture and clean 400 million litres of stormwater each year – the equivalent of 160 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

Treated stormwater is already being used to irrigate two council reserves with the number set to increase to 31 in the coming years.

The wetland’s walking trails and picnic and barbecue areas have also become popular destinations for families.

Flinders University’s Paul Green was one of the experts who guided members of the public through the surveys.

“The greatest value of BioBlitz was showing the hidden biodiversity and secret life of the wetland to the public,” Mr Green said.


City Limits Magazine

The City Limits Magazine is a community publication that keeps Marion residents in touch with what is happening in their community. It includes information about major projects, council initiatives and events, as well as profiles of community members.

It is published three times a year and distributed to 40,000 residents and businesses in the Marion Council area.